Dr. Esther Mullens

SC-CSC Post-doctoral Research Associate

University of Oklahoma


Responsibilities at SC CSC:

Esther Mullens (née White) is a Postdoctoral Researcher with the SC CSC. Her role at the center is to pursue stakeholder-relevant climate science, assist researchers with climate data interpretation, and help manage the SC-CSC portfolio of historical and future climate data. Esther participates in outreach activities and student development through undergraduate research and facilitating bi-weekly discussions on new and relevant climate science across multiple disciplines.

Biography:

By training, Esther is an Atmospheric Scientist with a Bachelors degree from the University of Reading (UK) and a PhD from the University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology. She has worked on various projects related to weather and climate. Currently, she spends her time examining future climate projections for the South Central United States, with a focus on hazards that impact the transportation sector, on a grant co-funded by the Southern Plains Transportation Center. Esther has also focused on winter weather hazards, including freezing rain and ice storms, and has recently developed a value-added climate length freezing precipitation dataset for the South Central United States. She plans to investigate how ice storms may change in the future, in addition to her broader interest of precipitation variability, climate dynamics, and climate adaptation.

Publications:

Mullens, E.D., and R.A McPherson, 2017: A Multi-Algorithm Reanalysis-based Freezing Precipitation Dataset for Climate Studies in the South-Central US. J. Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 56, doi: 10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0180.1.

Mullens, E. D., L. M. Leslie, and P. J. Lamb, 2016: A synoptic climatology of ice and snow storms in the Southern Great Plains 1993-2011. Weather and Forecasting, 31, 1109-1136, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/WAF-D-15-0172.1

Mullens, E. D., L. M. Leslie, and P. J. Lamb, 2016: Impacts of Gulf of Mexico SST Anomalies on Southern Plains freezing precipitation: WRF-ARW sensitivity study of the January 28-30 2010 Winter Storm. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-14-0289.1

Chen, S., J. Zhang, E. Mullens, Y. Hong, A. Behrangi, Y. Tian, X. M. Hu, J. Hu, Z. Zhang, and X. Zhang, 2015: Mapping the Precipitation Type Distribution over the Contiguous United States using NOAA/NSSL National Multii-Sensor Mosaic QPE, IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 53 (8), 4434-4443.

Mullens, E. D., M. Shafer, J. Hocker, 2013: Trends in heavy precipitation in the southern U.S.A. Weather, 68, 311-316.

Farnsworth, A., E. D. White, C. J. R. Williams, E. Black, and D. R. Kniveton, 2011: Understanding the large-scale driving mechanisms of rainfall variability over Central Africa. African Climate and Climate Change, C. J. R. Williams and D. R. Kniveton (Eds). Advances in Global Change Research, 43, 101-122.