Past Events

Introduction to Climate Change Adaptation Planning Course (An ITEP Workshop)

Jun. 6, 2017 - Jun. 8, 2017

Albuquerque, NM

This course is intended for tribal environmental and natural resource professionals who expect to be involved in climate change adaptation planning. The course will provide an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, highlighting the work of several tribes. Since the course will focus on climate change impacts in the Southwest region, environmental professionals from that region are encouraged to attend.

The course is hosted by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP), whose mission is to strengthen tribal capacity and sovereignty in environmental and natural resource management through culturally relevant education, research, partnerships and policy-based services.

Register here! Applications received by Friday, April 28, 2017, will have priority consideration.

Space is limited, so please be sure to get your application in as soon as possible. ITEP will pay lodging costs and reimburse per diem for selected tribal participants specifically tribal environmental staff and tribal members. All participants are responsible for their own transportation costs (airfare, taxis, shuttle service, mileage, etc.). 

If you would prefer to receive and fill out a pdf application form, please contact Colleen Davis whose contact information is provided below.

Email Colleen.Davis@nau.edu
Phone: (928) 523-6327
Fax: (928) 523-1266
Mail: Colleen Davis, ITEP Climate Change Program; Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals; PO Box 15004; Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5004

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Building Resilience Through Actionable Science Gulf Coast Workshops

Jun. 6, 2017 - Jun. 9, 2017

A study funded collaboratively by the South Central CSC, Southeast CSC, and Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks LCC titled Enhancing the Adaptive Capacity of Coastal Wetlands in the Face of Sea-level Rise and Coastal Development will be featured in several upcoming stakeholder workshops.

The workshops are being organized by the USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (WARC) and the Nature Conservancy’s Gulf of Mexico Whole Systems Program (TNC). These discussion-based workshops are designed to introduce attendees to the findings from the WARC’s work on tidal saline wetland migration and from TNC’s work on open space protection in the Gulf area. Participants will then discuss potential applications of these findings in land use, conservation, and flood mitigation planning, and how customization of these products might make them more useful for future decision-making.

Registration is free but space is limited and registration is required. You can register for the Lake Charles, LA and Biloxi, MS workshops here.

About the Organizers

Coastal Wetland Migration – USGS
In the 21st century, accelerated sea-level rise and continued coastal development are expected to greatly alter coastal landscapes across the globe. In a recent study funded jointly by the Southeast and South Central CSCs, Dr. Michael Osland, Nicholas Enwright, and Kereen Griffith identified areas where tidal saline wetlands may adapt via landward migration along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. These analyses provided information that can be used to identify migration corridors and develop future-focused sea-level rise adaptation strategies that will improve the potential that the ecosystem goods and services provided by these wetlands will continue to be available for future generations.

Open Space – The Nature Conservancy
TNC’s Dr. Christine Shepard partnered with Dr. Sam Brody and Dr. Wes Highfield, both of Texas A&M University, to identify which watersheds across the Gulf coast are the best targets for strategic land conservation to both reduce flood risk and conserve biodiversity. The analysis identified 421 watersheds along the Gulf of Mexico that have both high likelihood of flood damages and high conservation value.  A selection of these watersheds is being targeted for workshops devoted to a discussion of open space protection as a flood risk reduction and conservation strategy.

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What Farmers Need - Developing Seasonal Climate Forecasts for Winter Wheat Producers

May. 5, 2017

Sarkeys Energy Center
Room A235
100 Boyd St, Norman, OK 73069

Toni Klemm, doctoral candidate in OU’s Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability (DGES), is the featured speaker for this month’s DGES Colloquium.

Agriculture is essential to global food security, but productivity can be severely impacted by drought, flood, or heat. Seasonal climate forecasts (SCF) – monthly forecasts with lead-times of one to 12 months – can warn agricultural producers of adverse conditions and reduce crop losses and federal compensation payments if correctly acted upon. SCF have been used by producers for decades, but SCF are also criticized by them for being hard to understand, unreliable, and for not providing enough relevant information for specific decisions. Using science co-production methods and an application-oriented perspective, we explored ways to improve these forecasts.

We conducted two studies that help us better understand the SCF needs of producers of winter wheat, the dominant crop in the Southern Great Plains, and assess if current SCF models perform well enough to provide tailored forecasts for winter wheat producers. Through a web survey we show that previous assumptions of forecast needs are not only inaccurate, but assumptions about decision timelines also don’t match real-world decision-making in winter wheat production. An assessment of forecast models further revealed that model error is small for some variables, but there may be alternative ways to produce more accurate forecasts.

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Communicating Climate Change for Tribes Workshop

Apr. 25, 2017 - Apr. 26, 2017

301 David L. Boren Blvd
4 Partners Place
Norman, OK 73019

This workshop will provide tribal members with tools and tactics they can use to discuss climate change with various audiences in their communities. Activities will include:

-Interactive, hands-on demonstrations
-Practicing outreach methods
-Presenting climate change information to tribal leaders, including a mock tribal council
-Presentations by native and non-native experts including Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, nationally renowned atmospheric scientist

To register, fill out the form attached to the agenda (above) and email a copy to Karen-dye@cherokee.org.

The agenda attachment includes nearby hotel and restaurant suggestions.

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Climate and Transportation Seminar

Apr. 18, 2017

Rawl Engineering Practice Facility, Room 200
815 S. Jenkins Ave, Norman, OK

Snowfall, heavy rain, extreme heat, gusty winds- all of these weather conditions can make transportation a challenge. Understanding the temperature and precipitation patters that will define a region’s climate in the future can help transportation engineers and managers plan ahead for extreme events. This means that climate researchers and infrastructure professionals have a lot that they can teach each other.

In this seminar hosted in partnership with the Southern Plains Transportation Seminar, Dr. Esther Mullens will discuss potential changes in regional climate that could have implications for transportation infrastructure decisions in the Southern Plains. Dr. Mullens is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the South Central Climate Science Center.

This seminar is part of a series developed by the South Central Climate Science Center and the Southern Plains Transportation Center to encourage decision-relevant knowledge exchange between the climate and transportation communities.

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Protocol Training for Building Long-Term Research Relationships in Oklahoma Indian Country

Feb. 22, 2017

9:00 AM-12:00 PM
Helmerich Collaborative Learning Center, Community Room
Bizzell Memorial Library
401 W. Brooks St, LL1
Norman, OK 73019

This workshop is designed for non-Native scholars (faculty members, postdocs, and graduate students) and non-Native government employees / researchers at the University of Oklahoma to gain a better understanding of and greater appreciation for working in Indian Country – especially in Oklahoma.

Those who attend will participate in a number of activities and discussions designed to create a greater awareness of:
1) The historical context (of Oklahoma Indian Country)
2) Building research relationships working collaboratively with tribal organizations
3) Nurturing respectful relationships.

Faculty members, researchers, and scholars will leave the workshop with a number of tools and resources designed to provide optimal potential for developing long-term research relationships.

REGISTER HERE

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Protocol Training for Building Long-Term Research Relationships in Oklahoma Indian Country

Feb. 21, 2017

2:00-5:00 PM
Four Partners Place, 3rd Floor Seminar Room
301 David L. Boren Blvd
Norman, OK 73072

This workshop is designed for non-Native scholars (faculty members, postdocs, and graduate students) and non-Native government employees / researchers at the University of Oklahoma to gain a better understanding of and greater appreciation for working in Indian Country – especially in Oklahoma.

Those who attend will participate in a number of activities and discussions designed to create a greater awareness of:
1) The historical context (of Oklahoma Indian Country)
2) Building research relationships working collaboratively with tribal organizations
3) Nurturing respectful relationships.

Faculty members, researchers, and scholars will leave the workshop with a number of tools and resources designed to provide optimal potential for developing long-term research relationships.

REGISTER HERE

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Journal Club Spring 2017 Kick-Off Meeting

Feb. 1, 2017

11:00 am-noon

201 Stephenson Parkway
Five Partner’s Place, Room 2106
Norman, OK 73019

Join us in kicking off our Journal Club for the Spring 2017 semester! This first meeting will be facilitated by SC CSC researcher Dr. Esther Mullens, who will present a useful framework for evaluating scientific papers that attendees can use to get the most out of future journal club meetings.

Undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, and faculty interested in diving into literature related to climatology and the impacts of our climate system on natural resources are welcome to join us for our bi-weekly Journal Club. The Club meets every other Wednesday at 11 AM in Room 2106 on the second floor of Five Partners Place (located on the University of Oklahoma’s Research Campus). If you have questions or would like to receive email notifications about Journal Club, please contact Esther Mullens at esther.white@ou.edu.

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Fire Summit 2016: Changing Fire Regimes

Dec. 7, 2016 - Dec. 9, 2016

Hilton Garden Inn
410 South 3rd Street
Manhattan, Kansas 66502

Are you a landowner, fire manager, firefighter or agency personnel who works with fire in the Great Plains? Join us for Fire Summit 2016: Changing Fire Regimes in Manhattan, KS December 7th-9th. The Summit will convene leading fire professionals from around the country to discuss fire topics presently impacting fire use as well as what is store for the future of fire.

You can view the agenda, reserve a room, and purchase summit tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fire-summit-2016-changing-fire-regimes-tickets-27490002337

Agenda Highlights
Plenary session topics include weather and fire, building partnerships, Great Plains fire history, and policy updates. A poster session, facilitated discussion about the future of fire in the Great Plains, and tour of the Konza Prairie Biological Station are also on the agenda. Participants will have ample opportunities to network with colleagues from across the Great Plains.

Sponsors
The summit is supported by the United States Geological Survey through the Department of the Interior South Central Climate Science Center on Grant #G15AP00156. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the participants and presenters and do not necessarily represent the views of the funding agency. Other sponsors of this event include Kansas Grazing Lands Coalition, Kansas State University Research and Extension, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program, Joint Fire Science Program and the Great Plains Fire Science Exchange.

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Journal Club

Dec. 5, 2016

201 Stephenson Parkway
Five Partner’s Place, Room 2106
Norman, OK 73019

This week, our journal club will be facilitated by Duncan Wilson and our presenter will be Aparna Bamzai. Aparna will be discussing her recent trip to the COP 22 conference in Marrakesh and will lead an activity for attendees intended to give them an international perspective on climate mitigation and adaptation challenges.

Undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, and faculty interested in diving into literature related to climatology and the impacts of our climate system on natural resources are welcome to join us for our bi-weekly Journal Club. The Club meets every other Monday at 3 pm in Room 2106 on the second floor of Five Partners Place (located on the University of Oklahoma’s Research Campus). If you have questions or would like to receive email notifications about Journal Club, please contact esther.white@ou.edu.

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